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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
, california, democratic senator barbara boxer. senator, it is so good for you to join us this evening. thank you. >> i'm delighted. just delighted. >> senator boxer, talk to me a bit about what we saw happen in 2008 on the one hand sort of women showing up in an amazing way as secretary of state clinton has said, putting all of those cracks in the glass ceiling and then rolling back right there in congress by 2010. what do we do to get our voices back? >> well, i believe we're going to have our voices back on election day. i really believe that the women are going to break for barack obama. and, you know, it isn't like these issues are hard to follow. we look at the republican platform and what does it say? it says that no abortion, no abortion, you're a criminal if you get an abortion, even in cases of rape and insiscest. the reason i po cuss on rape is how outrageous it is, melissa. it is a crime. it's such a vicious crime in half the states there no limitation. if there's dna found 10, 20 later, you go after the perpetrator. i think women get it. mitt romney didn't lift a finger to change
relatively little fanfare. voters in california approved a ballot measure to reform the state's notorious three strikes law. one of the strict he's sentencing policies in the nation. under the law, if a defendant has two serious convictions, a third conviction for any felony automatically resulted in imprisonment 25 years to life. that meant that a crime like shoplifting could earn the offender a life sentence. under the revised law, a life sentence goes into effect if the third felony is a violent crime. california's decision is a long overdue movement on the practice of imposing the heaviest sentences for the lightest of crimes. unfortunately, there's been much less progress when it comes to u.s. drug policy and reform around mandatory minimum sentencing. the 1986 anti-drug abuse act was passed after the death of university of maryland player len bias from a drug overdose. it started by tip o'neil of making a demonstration of being tough on crime. it was intended to prosecute high-level drug dealers. what it actually did was to ensnare low level offenders for small quantities of drugs b
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)